archive message nailing honey to the bee

My witness is the empty sky.
person: that's a cool song
me: welL LET ME JUST TELL YOU THEIR ENTIRE BACKSTORY AND HOW MUCH I LOVE THEM AND ALL OF THEIR SONGS AND THE NAMES OF THEIR CHILDREN
kights:

coachella is so surreal
surrealunit:

The Brian Jonestown Massacre
acehotel:

Running through The Louvre, from Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers. 
Today the filmmaker turns 74. And to this day The Louvre forbids running.
jtotheizzoe:

The Moon Goes Red Tonight
Are you in North, Central, or South America? Do you like staying up late and staring up at the sky? Yes? Then I have good news!
You can catch a total lunar eclipse Monday night, in all of its dusty-red glory, from just about anywhere in North America with a clear view of the night sky. The moon will enter the darkest part of Earth’s shadow (the “umbra”) at 1:58 AM ET, and remain there until 4:24 AM ET. At 3:06 ET, the moon will be completely darkened by the Earth’s shadow!
Except that the moon won’t be completely dark. During a lunar eclipse, the moon turns a dusty shade of red. Why is that? You can thank Earth’s atmosphere.
To understand the red color of a lunar eclipse, it’s best to see how Earth would look from the moon. Check out the image of Earth eclipsing the sun (it’s not a real photo, btw. It was created from several images taken by Apollo astronauts):

(via Astro Bob)
See that halo of light around Earth? Our diffuse shell of air and dust bends and reflects a portion of the eclipsed sun’s light around the planet and onto the obscured moon. And since only the longest wavelengths of light make it through our atmosphere without being scattered away by the air molecules (the same reason that sunsets are red), the moon is bathed in crimson! Here’s a video I made about that atmospheric color show:

Check out more eclipse goodness at Bad Astronomy. Top image via Wikipedia.
tinycinema:

Beat Girl (1960)

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)
scienceyoucanlove:

Don’t forget to look up during the lunar eclipse on April 15th! It’s the first of a rare tetrad of four total lunar eclipses that will occur around six months apart over the next two years. The total lunar eclipse is often called a “blood moon” because when the Moon passes through Earth’s shadow it has an eerie red glow. You’re likely to see a very bright Mars too. Start watching the skies.Find out more: http://bit.ly/1n0AdVu via Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
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